By Hans Joachim Melzian

Edo, also known as Bini, is the language spoken through a few million humans in and round Benin urban in Nigeria. it's the lanuage of the previous Benin nation, well-known for its artwork.

There exist Edo-English dictionaries: this publication and

* Agheysi, Rebecca N. - An Edo-English Dictionary, 1986.

Other usefull books in LG for the scholar of the Edo language are:

* Osayomwanbo Osemwegie Ero - Egirama Edo Nogbae (Intensive Edo Grammar), 2003
* Egharevba, Jacob - Itan Edagbon Mwen, 1972
* Ebohon, Osemwegie - Agbon-izeloghomwan Kevbe Ehengbuda, 1974

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